Wordless Wednesday: generation doesn’t matter, childhood is eternal.

The Big T's aunts Mary and Hazel, and his uncle Tom.

The Big T’s aunts Mary and Hazel, and his uncle Tom.

Advertisements

Tombstone Tuesday: war dead remembered

The Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial in Lowestoft, to members of the service who have no known resting place - including my great grand uncle, Stewart Cameron Cruden. Died 9 March 1942 in the sinking of HMT Shera in the Barents Sea.

The Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial in Lowestoft. To members of the service who have no known resting place,  including my great grand uncle, Stewart Cameron Cruden. Died 9 March 1942 in the sinking of HMT Shera in the Barents Sea. Photo credit: Royal Naval Patrol Service http://www.rnps.lowestoft.org.uk/memorial/panels/panel_8.htm

The Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial commemorates the 2385 servicemen and women from the RNPS who lost their lives 1939-46 and who have no known grave. Most of these, like my great grand uncle Stewart Cruden, died at sea.

Kirkcaldy War Memorial; Stewart Cruden's name appears here.

Kirkcaldy War Memorial; Stewart Cruden’s name appears here. Photo: Su Leslie 2013.

Stewart Cruden is also remembered on the Kirkcaldy War Memorial.

The fate of HMT Shera: “Closed Until 1972”

Strolling ... Stewart Cruden and his mother with an unknown (to me) couple

Strolling … Stewart Cameron Cruden with his mother and an unknown couple.

Growing up, I often heard my mother talk about her great uncle “Sanky” who had died “in the war.” The bare bones of the story were that he drowned while serving on the Arctic Convoys, but like most family stories, it sat at the back of my mind, unexamined and half-forgotten.

When I first began researching my family history, mum sent me the photo above of her Uncle Sanky – whose real name was Stewart Cameron Cruden.  My mum doesn’t know when or where the photo was taken, or who the other people were, but that image of a confident young man walking nonchalantly towards the photographer somehow made him real to me and it became important to understand more about his life and death.

Life …

Continue reading

Wordless Wednesday: worthy of remembrance

The Big T's aunts Hazel and Mary and uncle Tom; all passed away now, but each lived a long and full lives. They have left behind children, grandchildren and other whanau who are glad they touched our lives.

The Big T’s aunts Hazel and Mary and uncle Tom; all passed away now, but each lived a long and full life. They have left behind children, grandchildren and other whanau who are glad they touched our lives.

Wordless Wednesdays are written in response to a Geneabloggers’ prompt.

Here are other Wordless Wednesdays’ you might like:

http://genealogysisters.wordpress.com/2013/10/16/almost-wordless-wednesday-paris-france-1944/

http://marbletowns.wordpress.com/2013/10/16/wednesdays-child-george-leonard-drowned/

http://wellerharvey.wordpress.com/2013/10/16/wordless-wednesday-october-16-2013/

http://genealogylady.net/2013/10/16/wordless-wednesday-the-yegerlehner-brothers/

http://thetaliaferroproject.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/16-september-2009-wordless-wednesday-john-robert-taliaferro/

Tombstone Tuesday: my Ramsay great grandparents

My mother's paternal grandparents; David Ramsay and Mary Fisher.

My mother’s paternal grandparents; David Ramsay and Mary Fisher.

Against the wall in Dysart Cemetery, is the grave of my great grandparents David Ramsay and Mary Fisher, along with their daughter Jean. They are the only Ramsay relatives I could find in Dysart, and although the grave wasn’t overgrown, it doesn’t look as though it’s regularly tended.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the family, probably because I don’t know very much about them. My great grandparents died before I was born, and even my grandad died when I was eleven. I have no memories of meeting any of his siblings, though my mum assures me I did.

My grandfather David Ramsay (top right) with his parents and siblings.

My grandfather David Ramsay (top right) with his parents and siblings.

Looking at the photos of the Ramsays my mum gave me, they mostly looked happy – especially my great grandfather.

David Skinner Ramsay and Mary Fisher; their fiftieth wedding anniversary.

David Skinner Ramsay and Mary Fisher; their fiftieth wedding anniversary.

I really like the simplicity of my great grandparents’ headstone – and particularly the line “worthy of remembrance.”

I don’t think you could really say anything better about someone.