Tombstone Tuesday: war dead remembered

The Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial in Lowestoft, to members of the service who have no known resting place - including my great grand uncle, Stewart Cameron Cruden. Died 9 March 1942 in the sinking of HMT Shera in the Barents Sea.

The Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial in Lowestoft. To members of the service who have no known resting place,  including my great grand uncle, Stewart Cameron Cruden. Died 9 March 1942 in the sinking of HMT Shera in the Barents Sea. Photo credit: Royal Naval Patrol Service http://www.rnps.lowestoft.org.uk/memorial/panels/panel_8.htm

The Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial commemorates the 2385 servicemen and women from the RNPS who lost their lives 1939-46 and who have no known grave. Most of these, like my great grand uncle Stewart Cruden, died at sea.

Kirkcaldy War Memorial; Stewart Cruden's name appears here.

Kirkcaldy War Memorial; Stewart Cruden’s name appears here. Photo: Su Leslie 2013.

Stewart Cruden is also remembered on the Kirkcaldy War Memorial.

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2 thoughts on “Tombstone Tuesday: war dead remembered

  1. I hope so too; it must be so very difficult for families to have no place to go to feel close to that person. I hadn’t really thought about it until I was in the little cemeteries in Scotland, and felt so close to ancestors – people I had never known, but was connected to by birth. How much more difficult to mourn a husband, father or son.

    A couple of years ago I got from Archives New Zealand, my partner’s uncle’s service record from WWI. He was killed in the 3rd battle of the Somme, and is now buried in the British War Cemetary at Martinsart, France. I was surprised to find a map reference and some jotted notes describing landmarks on the page relating to his death. A military historian I know told me they were put there by the initial burial party so that the bodies could be identified when they were moved for permanent burial. I thought that, in the middle of battle, that was such a thoughtful thing to do. Having been to some Commonwealth War Cemetaries, I am glad that those soldiers went to such trouble to allow their fallen comrades a proper final resting place.

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